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Glenwood train station named in memory of long serving manager

Family on hand for the unveiling of the Edward P. Fahey Memorial Building plaque included youngest daughter Patricia Fahey Collier (left) and granddaughter Monica Fahey Higgins.
Family on hand for the unveiling of the Edward P. Fahey Memorial Building plaque included youngest daughter Patricia Fahey Collier (left) and granddaughter Monica Fahey Higgins.

GLENWOOD, NL – Back in a time when Glenwood’s railway station was a beehive of activity, Edward P. Fahey was the man who kept everything organized and in running order.

He was 19 years old when he began his career with the Glenwood station in 1919. By the time he retired, in 1964, he was station manager.

With Fahey’s career spanning more than four decades in Glenwood, resident Calvin Kinden took it upon himself to have the building named in honour of the former manager.

“I grew up in Glenwood and I felt that some of its history was going to be lost in time,”  Kinden said. “I was afraid that people wouldn’t know who Mr. Fahey was, or how busy the trains were, so I thought this would be a nice way to keep that memory.”

Kinden pointed out a lot of Fahey’s work involved telegraphy, sending and receiving messages via Morse Code. At that time the railway was heavily involved in transporting timber, and fuel for Gander airport throughout World War II.

“That made this railway station very important and very busy,” he said. “It was kind of like what ATC – Air Traffic Control – is to airplanes.

The old Glenwood train station has been official named the Edward P. Fahey Memorial Building, in memory of a long-serving station manager.

“With Glenwood being the beehive it was, he managed to keep it all straight.”

The station, which Kinden estimates to have been built in the late 1930s or early 1940s, had been moved from along the former railway bed and into Glenwood in 2013, so it could be preserved.

“I thought it would be appropriate to have this building with no name on it, named the Edward P. Fahey Memorial Building,” he said.

While it took some time for the idea to see completion, it was something the town was in favour of doing he said.

On  July 23, with Fahey’s family in attendance, the unveiling took place.

Now, Kinden said, “The history is not lost.”

 

adam.randell@ganderbeacon.ca

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