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The House of Diamonds hosts Writers in Winter


Against a backdrop of colourful landscapes depicting Newfoundland scenery, poet Phillip Patey from Lewisporte reads to an appreciative group.

They’ve gathered at the House of Diamonds in Glovertown on a wintry February day to listen to writers—published and unpublished—read from their own work.

“You feel the need to write, then you want to send it out somewhere, and this is one way to ‘publish’ your work,” says Patey.

Kevin Blackmore—performer, musician, painter and writer—is chair of the House of Diamonds board and he’s organized this event.

Blackmore kicked things off by reading some of his own work, then introduced and encouraged other writers. It’s that kind of event. Many of the audience members are writers and offer their own comments when someone reads.

The writers range in experience from Gary Collins of Hare Bay who’s published 10 books to Samantha Ralph—currently a student at the College of the North Atlantic in Grand Falls-Windsor—who’s just starting out and mainly shares her work online.

Ralph—who writes fantasy and science fiction—says she’s attended Writers in Winter before, but this is the first time she’s had the courage to read.   

She says, “I think it’s good to do something like this because you get advice from other writers on how to perfect your craft. And when you get the approval of other writers, you know you’re doing something right.”

The event was scheduled to run all day, with Blackmore promising the audience a light lunch that included a pureed soup he made himself. It’s that kind of event.

Patey finishes up his reading with a short poem that he says could be a tweet, if he was a tweeter.

“When I arrived in heaven,

I could still smell the peanut butter,

So spake the mouse.”

The audience loves it.

The Beacon extends appreciation to Phillip Patey for permission to print his poem.

They’ve gathered at the House of Diamonds in Glovertown on a wintry February day to listen to writers—published and unpublished—read from their own work.

“You feel the need to write, then you want to send it out somewhere, and this is one way to ‘publish’ your work,” says Patey.

Kevin Blackmore—performer, musician, painter and writer—is chair of the House of Diamonds board and he’s organized this event.

Blackmore kicked things off by reading some of his own work, then introduced and encouraged other writers. It’s that kind of event. Many of the audience members are writers and offer their own comments when someone reads.

The writers range in experience from Gary Collins of Hare Bay who’s published 10 books to Samantha Ralph—currently a student at the College of the North Atlantic in Grand Falls-Windsor—who’s just starting out and mainly shares her work online.

Ralph—who writes fantasy and science fiction—says she’s attended Writers in Winter before, but this is the first time she’s had the courage to read.   

She says, “I think it’s good to do something like this because you get advice from other writers on how to perfect your craft. And when you get the approval of other writers, you know you’re doing something right.”

The event was scheduled to run all day, with Blackmore promising the audience a light lunch that included a pureed soup he made himself. It’s that kind of event.

Patey finishes up his reading with a short poem that he says could be a tweet, if he was a tweeter.

“When I arrived in heaven,

I could still smell the peanut butter,

So spake the mouse.”

The audience loves it.

The Beacon extends appreciation to Phillip Patey for permission to print his poem.

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