Top News

Good attendance for Warbirds over Harmon


“Warbirds” were over Harmon once again as The Friendly Invasion events wound down two exciting weeks of activity this past Saturday.

Only this time the aircraft were models of military planes mainly from the era of World War II but with even a few in the air from World War I as the Bay St. George R C (Radio Controlled) Flyers held their “Warbirds over Harmon” Fun Fly and Static Display.

A prepared release from the R C Flyers said the event had 15 registered pilots and well over 200 visitors flock to the field on the east Ramp at Stephenville Airport.

Doug Fowlow of the Flyers said it turned out to be great weather day despite a doubtful forecast and a thunderstorm the night before. There were 19 military planes on display, many of which also flew.

Ivan Kristensen, former Canadian National aerobatics champion and Carl Layden, Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Hall of Fame Member, put on some great displays of aerobatics that thrilled the crowd. 

Fowlow said a large delegation of visiting pilots from central Newfoundland also displayed their skills while Kip Kaus of Kippens proved he can fly with the best. 

Jack White of Port au Port thrilled the crowd with his DR1 Fokker tri-plane in the sky, while his DR-7 in the static displays took the award for best vintage aircraft.

Chris Dohaney of Stephenville’s large scale F4U Corsair won the best scale award, while Carl Layden’s Hanger 9 Spitfire with considerable added detailing took the best stand-off scale award.

The George Eavis Award for the people’s choice went to Ken Stack of Gander for his 60-inch span F4U Corsair.

Tower Hobbies of Champaign, Illinois, USA provided gift certificates of $25 US each for the award winners.

The audience favourite in the air, especially for the kids, was a delta shaped flying wing, quickly nicknamed “the bat”, thrown about the sky by Marc French of Gander at speeds of up to 100 mph.

Also popular with the children was a First Person View (FPV) equipped cub with a sharp “eye” equipped pilot that performed several “candy” drops.

The activities began at 9 a.m. and wrapped up at approximately 4:30 p.m. on that day.

Only this time the aircraft were models of military planes mainly from the era of World War II but with even a few in the air from World War I as the Bay St. George R C (Radio Controlled) Flyers held their “Warbirds over Harmon” Fun Fly and Static Display.

A prepared release from the R C Flyers said the event had 15 registered pilots and well over 200 visitors flock to the field on the east Ramp at Stephenville Airport.

Doug Fowlow of the Flyers said it turned out to be great weather day despite a doubtful forecast and a thunderstorm the night before. There were 19 military planes on display, many of which also flew.

Ivan Kristensen, former Canadian National aerobatics champion and Carl Layden, Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Hall of Fame Member, put on some great displays of aerobatics that thrilled the crowd. 

Fowlow said a large delegation of visiting pilots from central Newfoundland also displayed their skills while Kip Kaus of Kippens proved he can fly with the best. 

Jack White of Port au Port thrilled the crowd with his DR1 Fokker tri-plane in the sky, while his DR-7 in the static displays took the award for best vintage aircraft.

Chris Dohaney of Stephenville’s large scale F4U Corsair won the best scale award, while Carl Layden’s Hanger 9 Spitfire with considerable added detailing took the best stand-off scale award.

The George Eavis Award for the people’s choice went to Ken Stack of Gander for his 60-inch span F4U Corsair.

Tower Hobbies of Champaign, Illinois, USA provided gift certificates of $25 US each for the award winners.

The audience favourite in the air, especially for the kids, was a delta shaped flying wing, quickly nicknamed “the bat”, thrown about the sky by Marc French of Gander at speeds of up to 100 mph.

Also popular with the children was a First Person View (FPV) equipped cub with a sharp “eye” equipped pilot that performed several “candy” drops.

The activities began at 9 a.m. and wrapped up at approximately 4:30 p.m. on that day.

Recent Stories