Top News

Lawn native excited to be part of Canadian Armed Forces exercise in Fortune Bay


Forty members of the Canadian Armed Forces set up camp on Brunette Island in Fortune Bay this week for a domestic response exercise dubbed Atlantic Guardian.

For Master Cpl. Ryan Tarrant, however, training off the Burin Peninsula was extra special.

The Lawn native, who has served in the military for 15 years, said he was excited for the opportunity to come back to the region.

“They needed volunteers to come out here for the exercises,” Tarrant said.

“It was a chance to come out close to home and enjoy an exercise out here on Brunette Island.”

This is not the first time the Canadian Armed Forces have used Brunette for training, but it is a first for Tarrant. The troops arrived from Canadian Forces Station (CFS) St. John’s on Tuesday and return Saturday.

“The previous couple years they were out here I didn’t get to go (because) I was working, so this was the first opportunity I had to come out,” he said.

With tropical storm Colin closing in on the province this week, the first night on the island was an interesting experience for the soldiers, Tarrant said.

“The tents were whipping around pretty hard. A couple people lost their tents, but we managed,” he said Wednesday.   

The RCMP and the provincial Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture are also involved in this week’s exercise. A Navy ship and an aircraft from the Air Force are taking part as well.

The objective of the training is to ensure effective collaboration among members of the Canadian Armed Forces and provincial and federal organizations when responding to domestic events within the province.

Think the response to Hurricane Igor in 2010, explained Lt. Cdr. Gerald Parsons, commanding officer of CFS St. John’s.

“Any exercise that can get the Army, Navy and Air Force (as well as) provincial and federal organizations working together is a good exercise,” he said.

Parsons agreed the first day on the island was challenging.

“The weather was enough to test everyone last night,” he said.

There is an upside to rough conditions, though, Parsons said.

“It’s even better for testing these soldiers’ morale and keeping their spirits up out here,” he said. 

colin.farrell@tc.tc

@Colin_TCMedia

For Master Cpl. Ryan Tarrant, however, training off the Burin Peninsula was extra special.

The Lawn native, who has served in the military for 15 years, said he was excited for the opportunity to come back to the region.

“They needed volunteers to come out here for the exercises,” Tarrant said.

“It was a chance to come out close to home and enjoy an exercise out here on Brunette Island.”

This is not the first time the Canadian Armed Forces have used Brunette for training, but it is a first for Tarrant. The troops arrived from Canadian Forces Station (CFS) St. John’s on Tuesday and return Saturday.

“The previous couple years they were out here I didn’t get to go (because) I was working, so this was the first opportunity I had to come out,” he said.

With tropical storm Colin closing in on the province this week, the first night on the island was an interesting experience for the soldiers, Tarrant said.

“The tents were whipping around pretty hard. A couple people lost their tents, but we managed,” he said Wednesday.   

The RCMP and the provincial Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture are also involved in this week’s exercise. A Navy ship and an aircraft from the Air Force are taking part as well.

The objective of the training is to ensure effective collaboration among members of the Canadian Armed Forces and provincial and federal organizations when responding to domestic events within the province.

Think the response to Hurricane Igor in 2010, explained Lt. Cdr. Gerald Parsons, commanding officer of CFS St. John’s.

“Any exercise that can get the Army, Navy and Air Force (as well as) provincial and federal organizations working together is a good exercise,” he said.

Parsons agreed the first day on the island was challenging.

“The weather was enough to test everyone last night,” he said.

There is an upside to rough conditions, though, Parsons said.

“It’s even better for testing these soldiers’ morale and keeping their spirits up out here,” he said. 

colin.farrell@tc.tc

@Colin_TCMedia

Recent Stories