Florida officials are issuing mosquito-borne disease advisories

The Florida Department of Health issues a statewide mosquito-borne disease advisory


After four confirmed cases of malaria in Sarasota County, the Florida Department of Health has issued a statewide advisory for the mosquito-borne disease. Floridians should practice using bug spray, avoid areas with high mosquito populations and wear long pants and shirts when possible. Health officials say aerial and ground spraying of mosquito repellents will continue in areas with high mosquito populations. The health department has advised the public to focus on mosquito protection by remembering to “drain and cover”. Drain water from trash cans, house drains, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flowerpots, or sprinklers or any other container that collects rainwater that is not used Swimming pools should be maintained and properly chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches, and patios. Clothing – Wear shoes, socks and long pants and long sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who have to work in areas where mosquitoes are present. Repellent – ​​Use mosquito repellent appropriately. Steve Harrison, manager of Orange County’s mosquito control division, says they are now following two concerns. “We’re under two mosquito-borne disease advisories. One is for eastern equine encephalitis and the other is for malaria,” he said. Jay Williams with the Florida Department of Health said malaria cases in South Florida are not contagious. It will take,” he said. Top headlines: Former NFL quarterback Ryan Mallett drowns off Florida coast ‘World’s largest’ Buc-ee’s store opens Monday Atlantic National Hurricane Center monitors two systems

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After four confirmed cases of malaria in Sarasota County, the Florida Department of Health has issued a statewide advisory for the mosquito-borne disease.

Floridians should practice using bug spray, avoid areas with high mosquito populations and wear long pants and shirts when possible.

Health officials say aerial and ground spraying is ongoing in mosquito-infested areas.

The health department advises the public to be diligent in their personal mosquito protection efforts, remembering to “drain and cover.”

  • Drain water from trash cans, house drains, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or sprinklers or any other container that collects rainwater.
  • Dispose of old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other unused items.
  • Empty and clean bird baths and pet water bowls at least once or twice a week
  • Protect boats and vehicles from rain with waterproof tarps.
  • Swimming pools should be maintained and properly chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use.
  • Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches, and patios.
  • Clothing – Wear shoes, socks and long pants and long sleeves. People who have to work in mosquito-infested areas may need this type of protection.
  • Repellent – ​​Use mosquito repellent appropriately.

Steve Harrison, manager of Orange County’s mosquito control division, says they are now following up on two concerns.

“We are under two mosquito-borne disease advisories. One for Eastern equine encephalitis and another for malaria,” he said.

Jay Williams with the Florida Department of Health said the good news is that malaria cases in South Florida are not contagious.

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“Malaria does not spread from person to person. It really takes a certain way to contract, especially through mosquitoes,” he said.

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