‘Moment of Annularity’ arrives in Oregon as solar eclipse blots out sun in parts of US – live updates | Solar eclipses

The ‘moment of annularity’ comes in Oregon

NASA says the moment the moon comes fully in front of the sun has arrived Oregon, creating a ring of fire is the visual highlight of today’s eclipse. It only lasts a few minutes.

Audiences first saw it at a watch party in Eugene, Oregon. However, the weather was not good. The celebration event was mostly moved indoors due to earlier rains.

Major events

From Bailey’s bells to fourth contact, today’s annular solar eclipse and especially the stages it operates in have their own lexicon.

First contact The moment when the outer edge of the Moon first touches the Sun’s disk as it travels across the face of the Sun. Second contactLogically, the moment the trailing edge of the Moon clears the edge of the Sun and the full ring begins.

Bailey’s bell effect seen during the total solar eclipse on 2 July 2019 from El Molle, Chile. Photo: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Shortly before that, Bailey’s Bells, Named after a 19th century English astronomer Francis Bailey, visible around the perimeter. Dotted, bright pearls are created by the last rays of sunlight shining through the lunar valleys.

During a total eclipse, it marks the moment when the Sun is completely blocked. But in today’s eclipse, when part of the Sun is still visible, it creates RingWhen a ring of fire appears around the entire circumference of the moon.

A third connection comes when the Moon moves away from the ring and touches the edge of the Sun again, and Fourth contactOr final contact is the final moment when the last part of the Moon appears to touch the Sun.

The Sun’s ring of fire is visible to hundreds of thousands of Americans as the annual eclipse sweeps across the continental United States in a southeasterly direction toward Texas.

The eclipse passed over Oregon and a small part of northern California, and sky watchers in New Mexico experienced the full effects of the moon passing in front of the sun.

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The ‘moment of annularity’ comes in Oregon

NASA says the moment the moon comes fully in front of the sun has arrived Oregon, creating a ring of fire is the visual highlight of today’s eclipse. It only lasts a few minutes.

Audiences first saw it at a watch party in Eugene, Oregon. However, the weather was not good. The celebration event was mostly moved indoors due to earlier rains.

Here are some pictures from the newswires.

The Moon passes in front of the Sun as seen from Albuquerque, New Mexico.
The Moon passes in front of the Sun as seen from Albuquerque, New Mexico. Photo: Sam Wasson/Getty Images
A couple with sunglasses watches the eclipse at Capitol Reef National Park in Utah.
A couple with sunglasses watches the eclipse at Capitol Reef National Park in Utah. Photo: George Frey/Getty Images
Hot air balloon pilot Alan Hahn of Aurora, Colorado, tries out his goggles at the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta in New Mexico.
Hot air balloon pilot Alan Hahn of Aurora, Colorado, tries out his goggles at the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta in New Mexico. Photo: Katie Oyan/AP
Eclipse photographers prepare their cameras in Albuquerque.
Eclipse photographers prepare their cameras in Albuquerque. Photo: Patrick T Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

Bill NelsonThe NASA administrator and former astronaut spoke on NASA TV about the “unique opportunities” eclipses provide for studying the Sun.

“In short, it’s a big day for NASA,” he said.

What we learn from these eclipses, along with our heliophysics research, has incredible benefits for our human exploration. The Sun is a powerfully hot, glowing ball of hydrogen and helium, and it actually holds the entire solar system together.

Without its energy we cannot exist on earth. Think for a moment. It affects everything we do on Earth: growing crops, our economy. It also affects our physical, mental and emotional well-being. We see its influence in our cultures, in our music, religion and sports.

As you look up today with your eclipse glasses, I hope you remember all the ways the sun can hit us. NASA will never stop studying our nearest star for the benefit of all terrestrial life on Earth.

While millions look to the sky in hopes of witnessing a spectacular show, others will deliberately avert their eyes from the famous ring of fire.

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In Navajo cultureAnd for other tribes, an eclipse is considered an intimate, celestial moment, and tribes do not eat, drink, sleep, or engage in physical activity when the moon passes the sun.

Dead Horse Point State Park in Utah is near the annual zone.
Dead Horse Point State Park in Utah is near the annual zone. Photo: Nick Jackson/Rex Shutterstock

Indigenous groups elsewhere use the occasion to offer cultural teachings, share stories and ensure members, especially the younger generation, learn sacred traditions.

Read more about solar eclipse customs among tribal people:

The first image of the Moon crossing the Sun

An annular solar eclipse has already begun in some parts of the United States. This image by AFP photographer Patrick Fallon As seen from Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Moon begins to cross in front of the Sun.

The moon begins crossing in front of the sun in Albuquerque, New Mexico on Saturday.
The moon begins crossing in front of the sun in Albuquerque, New Mexico on Saturday. Photo: Patrick T Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

How can I see it?

Then the President Donald Trump A perfect example of how not to do that was during the 2017 total solar eclipse, looking directly at the sun from the White House without any eye protection.

Donald Trump watches the 2017 eclipse.
Donald Trump watches the 2017 eclipse. Photo: Kevin Lamarck / Reuters

NASA emphasizes a safety-first approach, and hired former NSYNC singer and noted space enthusiast Lance Pass for This video Explains how to view the sky safely when the celestial bodies are in sync (see What the Clever Space Agency Did There?).

Essentially, if your telescope doesn’t have a pair of special eclipse glasses, a solar viewer, or a solar filter, you’ll have to find another way. of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has This video The box shows how to build a pinhole projector, but you’ll need to get your skates.

Timeless? Take a kitchen colander and hold it about 20 inches off the floor over a piece of white paper or cardboard. As long as it’s not cloudy, you should see many pictures of the eclipse.

Where can I see it?

For the best view, you should be in the direct path of the eclipse. After the previous period Cross over to AlaskaThe trough begins at 9:13 a.m. in Oregon and moves southeast over parts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, crossing the vast expanse of Texas and entering the Gulf of Mexico.

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From there, it moves through the Yucatan Peninsula, Belize and several Central and South American countries, exiting the Atlantic on the east coast of Brazil. The show ends at sunset over the Atlantic Ocean.

A map of where to view the eclipse.

But at least a partial eclipse, minus the Ring of Fire, will be visible in 41 other continental states, including Alaska. The farther you go from the direct path, the less percentage of the Sun is covered.

If you’re not in an area where you can see the eclipse, or if it’s a cloudy day where you are, various live broadcasts with telescopes from the track will cover the event. of NASA Here it isAnd San Francisco’s Exploratorium Museum offers their own version Here.

See what you can expect at your location, when and where Easy verification of timeanddate.com Here.

People watch the sunrise at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, Saturday, as they wait for the sun's rare 'ring of fire' eclipse.
People watch the sunrise at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, Saturday, as they wait for the sun’s rare ‘ring of fire’ eclipse. Photo: Rick Bomer/AP

So, what is an annular eclipse?

are, As NASA explains here, different types of solar eclipses, from partial to total. An annular eclipse is when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, but when it is at or near its farthest point from Earth.

Because the Moon is far from the Earth, it appears smaller than the Sun and does not completely cover it. As a result, the Moon appears as a dark disc on top of a large, bright disc, giving the appearance of a ring around the Moon.

An annular eclipse was observed from Albuquerque, New Mexico on 20 May 2012.
An annular eclipse was observed from Albuquerque, New Mexico on 20 May 2012. Photo: Lucas Jackson / REUTERS

A recent phenomenon seen in North America It was in 2012. The next won’t be in Alaska until 2039 and the lower 48 states in 2046.

There is a detailed account of annular eclipses and why they are so rare timeanddate.comThe website is here.

Good morning, sky watchers, solar enthusiasts and enthusiasts. Welcome to our blog covering Saturday’s annual solar eclipse, which crosses a good portion of the U.S. and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, giving the Sun a spectacular ring of fire.

The action kicks off in at least two hours at 9.18am PT (12.18pm ET) in the mainland US. Oregon, it starts getting dark an hour earlier. From Oregon TexasThe entire event from daylight to darkness to daylight takes about three hours, although the peak at any point lasts only five minutes.

We’ll be previewing the event and bringing it to you as it happens.

As we prepare, check out this explanation from my colleague Erum Salam:

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