Philip’s remnants bring heavy rain to Maine

Philip’s remains are expected to move into eastern Maine Saturday night into Sunday morning. As it moves quickly through the area, there is a risk of flash flooding. As of 11 a.m. Friday, the storm was 110 miles from Bermuda with sustained winds of 50 mph. Post-tropical Phillip is moving north/northeast at 16 mph. The 11 a.m. advisory is the final advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center because Phillip is no longer a tropical system. Remnants of this storm will approach the coast of eastern Maine, Nova Scotia or New Brunswick. As Post-Tropical Phillip approaches Maine, it will interact with a developing cold front approaching from the west. Heavy rain and winds from integrated systems will affect the region with the most significant impacts on the Midcoast. The timing of the storm will bring rain to the area Saturday and Sunday morning. A flash flood watch has been issued for the central region. and eastern Maine from Saturday afternoon through Sunday morning. Excessive flows can cause flooding in rivers, creeks, streams and other low-lying and flood-prone areas. Storm drains and ditches can become clogged with debris from fall leaves. A high surf advisory has been issued for Sunday. Large breaking waves of 6 to 10 feet are forecast along the coasts of York, Cumberland, Sagadahoe, Lincoln, Knox and Waldo counties. Hazardous swimming and surfing conditions and localized beach erosion are possible. Maine’s entire team of meteorologists will continue to monitor the storm and update the forecast as it moves through the area. Below inspiration radar 6IDEwMHZ3OyB9IEBtZWRpYSBvbmx5IHNjcmVlbiBhbmQgKG1pbi13aWR0aDogNDEuMjVyZW0pIHsgLmVtYmVkLXJhZGFyIHsgaGODS4 KPHNjcmlwdCB0eXBlPSJ0ZXh0L2phdmFzY3JpcHQiIHNyYz0iaHR0cHM6Ly 93aWRnZXRzLWx0cy5tZWRpYS53ZWF0aGVyLmNvbS93dC Mjg1MjgwMSI+PC9zY3JpcHQ+CjxkaXYgY2xhc3M9ImVtYmVkLXJhZGFyIj4KPHd4LXdpZGdldCB0eXBlPSJtYXAiIGxhdGl0dWRlPSIZ12MWRlPSIzN 03 OS4zMjkwNzgiIG1lbnVpdGVtcz0iMDAxNSwwMDAxLDAwMTcsMDAyMSIgbWFwaWQ9IjAwMjIiIG1lbWJlcmlkPSIxMTY5IiB6b29tbGV2ZWYW9 iIG9wYWNpdHk9Ii42IiBmdWxsc2NyZWVuPSJ0cnVlIiBoZWFkZXI9ImZhbHNlIiBqcz0ib HRzIiBhbmltYXRlPSJ0cnVlIj48L3PCGdkad9

See also  Italy's Eni signs $8 billion Libyan gas deal during Prime Minister Meloni's visit to Tripoli

Philip’s remains are expected to move into eastern Maine Saturday night into Sunday morning. There is a risk of flash floods due to rapid movement in the area.

As of 11 a.m. Friday, the storm was 110 miles from Bermuda with sustained winds of 50 mph. Post-tropical Phillip is moving north/northeast at 16 mph.

As Phillip is no longer a tropical system, the 11 a.m. advisory is the final advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center. Remnants of this storm will approach the coast of eastern Maine, Nova Scotia or New Brunswick.

As Post-Tropical Phillip approaches Maine, it will interact with a developing cold front approaching from the west. Heavy rainfall and winds from integrated systems will have the most significant impacts on the Midcoast.

The storm will continue to rain Saturday and possibly into Sunday morning.

A Flash Flood Watch has been issued for parts of central and eastern Maine from Saturday afternoon through Sunday morning. Excessive flows can cause flooding in rivers, creeks, streams and other low-lying and flood-prone areas. Storm drains and gutters can become clogged with debris from fall leaves.

A high surf advisory has been issued for Sunday. Large breaking waves of 6 to 10 feet are forecast along the coasts of York, Cumberland, Sagadahoe, Lincoln, Knox and Waldo counties. Hazardous swimming and surfing conditions and localized beach erosion are possible.

Meteorologists with Maine’s Total Weather team are continuing to monitor the storm and will continue to update the forecast as it moves through the area.

See also  Ghosn is suing Nissan for $1 billion in financial and reputational damages

Interactive radar below:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *